Coronavirus Chronicles – January 26

At this time last year I unfollowed Peachy Keenan on Twitter because I was tired at how much she was alarming over the coronavirus. Her constant theme was shut down the airports.

At this time last year, if I remember correctly, Jordan Peterson had decidedly dropped out of public notice for half a year and I was wondering where he was. It looks like he is back, though somewhat less combative by his own admission.

It makes me think of the circle of those who have conversations I want to listen to: he was having a conversation with Douglas Murray. I think of it in many ways as the John Anderson circle. John Anderson has interesting conversations with a repeating group of people, and they are conversations I want to overhear. For that I’m glad to live in an age of youTube and podcasting, for the access to the living voice of contemporary minds. Speaking of podcasting, a year ago the American Mind started The Roundtable. After a rough beginning, they hit their stride just in time for the eventful moments of 2020. They are always running a bit more alarmed than I am, but right now there are so many canaries falling silent in this coronavirus coalmine.

What else would it be though? Who could have predicted all that came of this last year? We certainly learn that pandemics bring mass hysteria. Nevertheless, I think those of us from whom the gift of prophecy has been withheld should not count the chickens of doom before they’re hatched.

I think, for example, after last year and heading into whatever the Biden administration bodes, the right is more combative, and this is good. There are lessons to be learned from that great catalyst, Trump our timely political entrepreneur. Angelo Codevilla did an assessment on American Greatness—of all places—that I found compelling. It leads me to reflect that American society appears to be rearranging itself in all kinds of ways and places, or accelerating a rearrangement that was taking place.

The constellations in which publications align are changing.

The status and appeal of higher education is another change.

I think grade and high school have to be undergoing some kind of change, even if it is only in terms of reinforcing what was already right, if not outright course corrections, even as the whole is obviously pulling in different direction.

What will happen in the churches? Apart from the one in which I find myself, most of the churches I have contact with are growing. But I wonder if that is the case overall. Still, I think a situation calling for more seriousness and gravity can only benefit true religion.

Politically, it has always seemed better to me instead of having a two-party thing to have more, to fragment the big parties. Perhaps that’s unamerican of me. It is probably wishful thinking on my part, but I’d like to see political fragmentation and the need for party coalitions, not coalitions within the parties.

Next election here is going to break records in terms of women vying for the nomination, and not just in terms of the possible candidates already getting poised. This transgender moment will have women up in arms.

One last bright note: already the poison of the moment has summoned up literary antidotes.

3 thoughts on “Coronavirus Chronicles – January 26

  1. Joel, thanks for the continued updates.

    On the question of true religion, I’d agree. I’ve already noticed some bright spots, in both online and face to face interactions.

    Secondly, the multi-party approach is some I wish for, as well. Indeed, Washington admonished against a small number of parties (perhaps it was two) in either his second inaugural address or his farewell address to the nation.

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